@3 years ago with 6 notes
#Buddha #Thai #Thai Cassette #Cover Art #achan prasong #molam #isan 
Music to read James Bond by…Vol. 2

Music to read James Bond by…Vol. 2

@3 years ago with 11 notes
#James Bond #Music #cover art #Reading #Vintage 
@3 years ago with 2 notes
#Three Ring Circus #Sunshine #Clown #Scary Clown 
Most people know little about the Moog synthesizer except that it’s electronic, it makes
 weird sounds and actor James Coburn owns one. Actually, the Moog does nearly 
everything but rob banks! It can simulate familiar sounds, musical and otherwise, as
 well as create new sounds. In case you want to impress your friends, say that the
 Moog (rhymes with vogue) is an electronic instrument of almost limitless acoustic 
flexibility noteworthy for its method of direct voltage control. Get it?
Anyone can play around with a Moog (particularly if he has the ten to fifteen thousand
it takes to buy one), but only a musician with the skill and adventurousness of Hugo
Montenegro could make as much music out of one as you will hear in this remarkable
album. It was a gargantuan task. Montenegro did all the writing in only one week. The
recording was done in layers - the rhythm section one day, later strings, voices, and
so on. This method was chosen, Hugo explains, “so that we could get cleaner
perspective of each musical segment and have complete control on remix.”
What is the point of the album? “People already know that the Moog can make odd
sounds,” says Hugo. “I was interested in the Moog’s musical values. I wanted to use it
as part of an orchestra - and also make commercial sense, if possible.”
That’s just what he did. While the album is both contemporary and intriguing, it is,
above all, musical. Credit must be given to master engineer Mickey Crofford, as well as
to Paul Beaver,* the man who “programmed” the Moog. As for the singers, headed by
Ron Hicklin, they’re as exciting as the Moog itself. Listen to their vibrant sound on
Aquarius, or Gene Morford’s solo on My Way. In many places, such as Dizzy, the
voices were run through the Moog. And let us not forget that an instrument - even an
electronic one - is only as good as its player. In this case the superskilled player is
 Mike Melvoin.
But this is Hugo Montenegro’s album. Because the Moog is such an experimental item
at this point, Hugo had ten decisions to make for every one demanded on most
projects. That the album presents such an entertaining balance of music is a tribute
to the arranger’s talent, craft and inventiveness. That Hugo got excited about writing
for the Moog in the first place is attributable, perhaps, to just the right touch of musical
madness.

MORGAN AMES 
 
Paul Beaver - courtesy of Limelight Records 
 © 1969, RCA Records

Most people know little about the Moog synthesizer except that it’s electronic, it makes
 weird sounds and actor James Coburn owns one. Actually, the Moog does nearly 
everything but rob banks! It can simulate familiar sounds, musical and otherwise, as
 well as create new sounds. In case you want to impress your friends, say that the
 Moog (rhymes with vogue) is an electronic instrument of almost limitless acoustic 
flexibility noteworthy for its method of direct voltage control. Get it?

Anyone can play around with a Moog (particularly if he has the ten to fifteen thousand
it takes to buy one), but only a musician with the skill and adventurousness of Hugo
Montenegro could make as much music out of one as you will hear in this remarkable
album. It was a gargantuan task. Montenegro did all the writing in only one week. The
recording was done in layers - the rhythm section one day, later strings, voices, and
so on. This method was chosen, Hugo explains, “so that we could get cleaner
perspective of each musical segment and have complete control on remix.”

What is the point of the album? “People already know that the Moog can make odd
sounds,” says Hugo. “I was interested in the Moog’s musical values. I wanted to use it
as part of an orchestra - and also make commercial sense, if possible.”

That’s just what he did. While the album is both contemporary and intriguing, it is,
above all, musical. Credit must be given to master engineer Mickey Crofford, as well as
to Paul Beaver,* the man who “programmed” the Moog. As for the singers, headed by
Ron Hicklin, they’re as exciting as the Moog itself. Listen to their vibrant sound on
Aquarius, or Gene Morford’s solo on My Way. In many places, such as Dizzy, the
voices were run through the Moog. And let us not forget that an instrument - even an
electronic one - is only as good as its player. In this case the superskilled player is
 Mike Melvoin.

But this is Hugo Montenegro’s album. Because the Moog is such an experimental item
at this point, Hugo had ten decisions to make for every one demanded on most
projects. That the album presents such an entertaining balance of music is a tribute
to the arranger’s talent, craft and inventiveness. That Hugo got excited about writing
for the Moog in the first place is attributable, perhaps, to just the right touch of musical
madness.

MORGAN AMES

 

Paul Beaver - courtesy of Limelight Records

© 1969, RCA Records

@3 years ago with 8 notes
#Moog #Moog Synth #Hugo Montenegro #cover art #psychedelic 
Cuba, the cradle of Latin American dance music, has given us over the years such international dance crazes as the Conga, the Rhumba, the Mambo and more recently the currently popular Cha Cha Cha. Strangely enough, the Danzon, rythm [sic] which is the original source of both the Mambo and Cha Cha Cha, has never achieved true popularity outside of Latin America where it has long been as standard as is the Fox Trot to the United States. Mariano Merceron, known throughout Latin America as “El Emperador del Danzon” (The Emperor of the Danzon), has dressed this venerable rythm [sic] in a bright new party dress, and now promises to make people forget that the Cha Cha Cha ever existed. This new style, called Danzon Guapacha, was responsible for making Mariano’s “La Margarita” the biggest single in Latin America early in 1959 and his first two albums MKL 1072 and MKL 1137 top sellers. Now in Volume III, he offers twelve more great arrangements on some old standards and some great new compositions written especially for this album.

Cuba, the cradle of Latin American dance music, has given us over the years such international dance crazes as the Conga, the Rhumba, the Mambo and more recently the currently popular Cha Cha Cha. Strangely enough, the Danzon, rythm [sic] which is the original source of both the Mambo and Cha Cha Cha, has never achieved true popularity outside of Latin America where it has long been as standard as is the Fox Trot to the United States. Mariano Merceron, known throughout Latin America as “El Emperador del Danzon” (The Emperor of the Danzon), has dressed this venerable rythm [sic] in a bright new party dress, and now promises to make people forget that the Cha Cha Cha ever existed. This new style, called Danzon Guapacha, was responsible for making Mariano’s “La Margarita” the biggest single in Latin America early in 1959 and his first two albums MKL 1072 and MKL 1137 top sellers. Now in Volume III, he offers twelve more great arrangements on some old standards and some great new compositions written especially for this album.

@3 years ago with 7 notes
#Alligator #Jazz #Jazz Art #Mariano Merceron #Saxophone #cover art #Crazy Eyes #Wild Eyes 
A demonstrator for Hammond organs, Layton was Mercury Records’ star organist at the height of the Space Age Pop era.
Layton’s style of playing was somewhere between the stiffness Ken Griffin’s and the wildness Julian Gould’s. He wasn’t too jazzy, but he was among the most technically proficient players of the Hammond, and could find little-known features and effects when he wanted to.
This was why Hammond retained him as a house performer for nearly 50 years. The company sent Layton around the world to demonstrate the instrument. Layton estimated once that he’d visited and played at over 700 stores in North and South America, Europe, Asia, and Australia.
Layton started studying music as a child, but he was studying meteorology in college when he enlisted in the Navy in World War Two. The Navy brought him in contact with his first Hammond organ, one sitting at the Naval Air Station in Linhurst, New Jersey. Layton figured out how to turn it on and play it, and after the war, he sought out the legendary Jesse Crawford for lessons.
He began playing for New York City theaters and eventually wound up as a regular at Radio City Music Hall. This led to a job with CBS radio, and he made the switch to television soon after. For years, Layton provided the syrupy organ for “The Secret Storm,” “The Love of Life,” and other classic soaps.
For sports fans, however, his more last fame stems from his remarkable stretch of 36 years as the organist for New York Yankees’ home games at Yankee Stadium. Hired in 1967, he played at thousands of games, providing Yankees fans with one of the few touches of old time baseball the Yankees kept from the Mickey Mantle days.
Mike Burke, who ran the Yankees for CBS when William Paley bought the team, offered the job to Layton, but heturned the Yankees’ first job offer down. “I don’t know anything about baseball,” he told them. “And besides, I live in Queens and I don’t drive.” But the wealthy team had an attractive comeback: “They told me that a limo would pick me up in front of my apartment in Forest Hills before every game,” he told a reporter. “And when the game ended, the limo would take me home.”
The gig was meant to be for between-innings performances only. But during one game when the team was taking a beating, Layton decided to try to liven things up by playing “Charge!,” an old military trumpet call. “The owner looked at me from his box, and gave me a thumbs up,” said Layton. “The next day, I got a raise.” This and other baseball warhorses, like the first few bars of “The Mexican Hat Dance,” can be credited to Layton. His last recording, Ya Gotta Have Heart commemorates his years of ballpark play.
Layton crossed over into other sports, playing for the Knicks basketball team and the Rangers hockey team in the 1970s and 1980s. He retired from the Yankees in 2003. “Eddie Layton was a treasured member of the Yankee family and, as a gifted musician, he made Yankee Stadium a happier place,” Steinbrenner remarked after his death.
Layton never married. His passion was model railroading and tugboats. He owned an impressive collection of the former and even one of the latter, which he cruised up and down the Hudson River.

A demonstrator for Hammond organs, Layton was Mercury Records’ star organist at the height of the Space Age Pop era.

Layton’s style of playing was somewhere between the stiffness Ken Griffin’s and the wildness Julian Gould’s. He wasn’t too jazzy, but he was among the most technically proficient players of the Hammond, and could find little-known features and effects when he wanted to.

This was why Hammond retained him as a house performer for nearly 50 years. The company sent Layton around the world to demonstrate the instrument. Layton estimated once that he’d visited and played at over 700 stores in North and South America, Europe, Asia, and Australia.

Layton started studying music as a child, but he was studying meteorology in college when he enlisted in the Navy in World War Two. The Navy brought him in contact with his first Hammond organ, one sitting at the Naval Air Station in Linhurst, New Jersey. Layton figured out how to turn it on and play it, and after the war, he sought out the legendary Jesse Crawford for lessons.

He began playing for New York City theaters and eventually wound up as a regular at Radio City Music Hall. This led to a job with CBS radio, and he made the switch to television soon after. For years, Layton provided the syrupy organ for “The Secret Storm,” “The Love of Life,” and other classic soaps.

For sports fans, however, his more last fame stems from his remarkable stretch of 36 years as the organist for New York Yankees’ home games at Yankee Stadium. Hired in 1967, he played at thousands of games, providing Yankees fans with one of the few touches of old time baseball the Yankees kept from the Mickey Mantle days.

Mike Burke, who ran the Yankees for CBS when William Paley bought the team, offered the job to Layton, but heturned the Yankees’ first job offer down. “I don’t know anything about baseball,” he told them. “And besides, I live in Queens and I don’t drive.” But the wealthy team had an attractive comeback: “They told me that a limo would pick me up in front of my apartment in Forest Hills before every game,” he told a reporter. “And when the game ended, the limo would take me home.”

The gig was meant to be for between-innings performances only. But during one game when the team was taking a beating, Layton decided to try to liven things up by playing “Charge!,” an old military trumpet call. “The owner looked at me from his box, and gave me a thumbs up,” said Layton. “The next day, I got a raise.” This and other baseball warhorses, like the first few bars of “The Mexican Hat Dance,” can be credited to Layton. His last recording, Ya Gotta Have Heart commemorates his years of ballpark play.

Layton crossed over into other sports, playing for the Knicks basketball team and the Rangers hockey team in the 1970s and 1980s. He retired from the Yankees in 2003. “Eddie Layton was a treasured member of the Yankee family and, as a gifted musician, he made Yankee Stadium a happier place,” Steinbrenner remarked after his death.

Layton never married. His passion was model railroading and tugboats. He owned an impressive collection of the former and even one of the latter, which he cruised up and down the Hudson River.

@3 years ago with 3 notes
#Eddie Layton #Hammond Organ #Space Age Pop #Retro #Vintage #Rocket #Out of This World #cover art 
This album is your invitation to LIVE IT UP with Mr. Kaempfert, whether you prefer to do it by dancing or listening to the accompaniment of his lively and lovely orchestral interpretations of such irresistible new melodies as Gentleman Jim, Tipsy Gypsy, Don’t Talk To Me, Give And Take, Candlelight Cafe, and many others.

This album is your invitation to LIVE IT UP with Mr. Kaempfert, whether you prefer to do it by dancing or listening to the accompaniment of his lively and lovely orchestral interpretations of such irresistible new melodies as Gentleman Jim, Tipsy Gypsy, Don’t Talk To Me, Give And Take, Candlelight Cafe, and many others.

@3 years ago with 3 notes
#Bert Kaempfert #music #cover art #Swimming #Vintage #Retro #Orchestral Pop 

Richard Hayman - “Genuine Electric Latin Love Machine”

@3 years ago with 3 notes
#Latin Love Machine #Richard Hayman #cover art #Robot 

In 1972, the original Organ Stop Pizza restaurant premiered in Phoenix, Arizona at the corner of 7th Street and Missouri Avenue with a Wurlitzer pipe organ which was originally built for Grauman’s Hollywood Egyptian Theater. This unique concept of a pizza parlor with a pipe organ was envisioned by William P. Brown, a Phoenix real estate developer whose enthusiasm for the theater pipe organ and its music led to the creation of this landmark attraction…READ MORE

@3 years ago with 19 notes
#Arizona #Organ #Organ Stop Pizza #Pizza #Wurlitzer #Wurlitzer Organ #Phoenix #Music #cover art #Vinyl #Vintage Vinyl #Retro 
Music to read James Bond by…Vol. 1

Music to read James Bond by…Vol. 1

@3 years ago with 4 notes
#James Bond #Music #cover art #Gold #Reading 
Polyphonics, which means “many sounds”, is quite an appropriate name for the 
group represented by this album. As you shall hear, many sounds emanate from 
each track. And, yet, the Polyphonics number only THREE…Ben Burley and Lou De 
Santis on the Hohner harmonicas and Dick Scholl with, what is lovingly called, “The 
Monster”.
Now, that your curiosity has been aroused, we hasten to explain “The Monster”. It 
can partly be referred to as a multiple track tape recorder utilizing Ampex 960 
machines. All other electronic equipment which is used for the purpose of providing 
the acoustical effects on this album was built by Dick Scholl. The Ampex Model 960 
Stereophonic Recorder/Reproducer is capable of essentially distortionless frequency
response from 30 to 20,000 cycles per second at the operating speed of 7 1/2 inches 
per second, and from 30 to 15,000 cycles per second at 3% inches per second.
These, then, are The Polyphonics…
Dick Scholl…audio technician…started on his musical career by playing professional 
accordian. He was able to fit in 7 years of mechanical experience before the brand 
new field of electronics opened up. Combining his mechanical experience and his 
study of electronics, Dick became a leading man in the electronics field. Dick 
collaborated with John Newit, who was responsible for most of Dick’s electronic 
training, to produce “Practical TV Servicing”, a text which is used today in TV training 
schools. Besides being a member of The Polyphonics, Dick Scholl is the owner of 
one of the few audio custom houses specializing in Audio component sales and 
service.
Ben Burley began playing the harmonica at a fairly early age and received quite a bit
of training with the famed original Borah Minevitch Harmonica Rascals. In his travels, 
Ben earned the distinction of becoming an expert at the unusual and rarely practised 
trade of harmonica tuning. While working with the Borah Minevitch group Ben met…
Lou De Santis, who had also been making music with the harmonica for a number of 
years. Lou also has a flair for writing and arranging. The arrangements for this album 
are Lou’s brain children, as is the song “A Woman”.
Both Ben and Lou thrived under the guidance of their work with Borah Minevitch. 
And their friendship and ideas thrived as well…resulting in their decision to go out 
on their own with an act and try to achieve their own niche in the harmonica field. 
Getting together an act for clubs presented a problem to the boys…that of 
amplification. Through recommendations and word of mouth, Ben and Lou finally 
sought the services of Dick Scholl and presented their problem to him. The rest is 
simple…Dick came up with “The Monster”, joined Ben and Lou in their night-club 
act and The Polyphonics were born.
Now, it’s time for you to get into the act. All you have to do is listen to these many
new exciting sounds. And we repeat…you will hear only TWO actual 
harmonicas. To quote Ampex Audio Inc., “This is quite a technical feat on your 
part and you are to be congratulated.” And Seeco congratulates The Polyphonics, 
too.

Polyphonics, which means “many sounds”, is quite an appropriate name for the 
group represented by this album. As you shall hear, many sounds emanate from 
each track. And, yet, the Polyphonics number only THREE…Ben Burley and Lou De 
Santis on the Hohner harmonicas and Dick Scholl with, what is lovingly called, “The 
Monster”.

Now, that your curiosity has been aroused, we hasten to explain “The Monster”. It 
can partly be referred to as a multiple track tape recorder utilizing Ampex 960 
machines. All other electronic equipment which is used for the purpose of providing 
the acoustical effects on this album was built by Dick Scholl. The Ampex Model 960 
Stereophonic Recorder/Reproducer is capable of essentially distortionless frequency
response from 30 to 20,000 cycles per second at the operating speed of 7 1/2 inches 
per second, and from 30 to 15,000 cycles per second at 3% inches per second.

These, then, are The Polyphonics…

Dick Scholl…audio technician…started on his musical career by playing professional 
accordian. He was able to fit in 7 years of mechanical experience before the brand 
new field of electronics opened up. Combining his mechanical experience and his 
study of electronics, Dick became a leading man in the electronics field. Dick 
collaborated with John Newit, who was responsible for most of Dick’s electronic 
training, to produce “Practical TV Servicing”, a text which is used today in TV training 
schools. Besides being a member of The Polyphonics, Dick Scholl is the owner of 
one of the few audio custom houses specializing in Audio component sales and 
service.

Ben Burley began playing the harmonica at a fairly early age and received quite a bit
of training with the famed original Borah Minevitch Harmonica Rascals. In his travels, 
Ben earned the distinction of becoming an expert at the unusual and rarely practised 
trade of harmonica tuning. While working with the Borah Minevitch group Ben met…

Lou De Santis, who had also been making music with the harmonica for a number of 
years. Lou also has a flair for writing and arranging. The arrangements for this album 
are Lou’s brain children, as is the song “A Woman”.

Both Ben and Lou thrived under the guidance of their work with Borah Minevitch. 
And their friendship and ideas thrived as well…resulting in their decision to go out 
on their own with an act and try to achieve their own niche in the harmonica field. 
Getting together an act for clubs presented a problem to the boys…that of 
amplification. Through recommendations and word of mouth, Ben and Lou finally 
sought the services of Dick Scholl and presented their problem to him. The rest is 
simple…Dick came up with “The Monster”, joined Ben and Lou in their night-club 
act and The Polyphonics were born.

Now, it’s time for you to get into the act. All you have to do is listen to these many
new exciting sounds. And we repeat…you will hear only TWO actual 
harmonicas. To quote Ampex Audio Inc., “This is quite a technical feat on your 
part and you are to be congratulated.” And Seeco congratulates The Polyphonics, 
too.

@3 years ago with 4 notes
#Dick Scholl #Just Plain Strange #Many Sounds #The Polyphonics #cover art #Vintage #Retro #Headphones #Harmonica 
"For decades Ethel Merman has been the heart and soul of the American Musical Theatre. Hearing this album, I’m convinced that this Disco Diva may be taking a whole new career! Not only are these songs among the world’s favorites, but the sheer joy of Merman’s voice makes me want to get up and dance. Bless you for boogeying, Ethel, you’re hot as a pistol!"
Paul Jabara “

"For decades Ethel Merman has been the heart and soul of the American Musical Theatre. Hearing this album, I’m convinced that this Disco Diva may be taking a whole new career! Not only are these songs among the world’s favorites, but the sheer joy of Merman’s voice makes me want to get up and dance. Bless you for boogeying, Ethel, you’re hot as a pistol!"

Paul Jabara “

@3 years ago with 6 notes
#Disco #Ethel Merman #cover art #Funny and Awesome at the Same Time 
SY MANN showed his earliest musical talent at age 6 when he began to correct mistakes, made by his older sister who was then a cello student, by reaching up to the keyboard of the family player-piano and striking the “right notes”. His parents took him to a piano instructor when he was 7 and in a short time it was discovered that he possessed absolute pitch. During public school assemblies he gave demonstrations of this phenomenon to the applause and wonder of his classmates and teachers. He continued his music education at NYU. Excelling in his music studies, Sy was elected to membership in the National Honorary music fraternity, PHI MU ALPHA SINFONIA and, later, held the post of student president of the music department of NYU School of Education. Back in civilian life after almost 4 years of service, Sy returned to NYU for his B.S. degree in Music Education, now a married man and father of a baby boy. Not particularly desirous of entering the teaching field, Sy continued with performing engagements, playing for most of show business’ top acts as well as stints with the bands of Alvino Ray and Benny Goodman. In 1949 he entered the radio field as staff pianist and arranger for New York’s top independent station WNEW. He then established himself in the recording, jingle and film music fields. In 1954 he joined the CBS music staff and currently is pianist-arranger on the Arthur Godfrey Show where he doubles on trumpet, vibraphone, clavietta, electric harpsichord and other assorted keyboard instruments. He has contributed his talents to numerous stars like Barbra Streisand, Tiny Tim, Sammy Davis, Connie Francis.
Anybody who plays piano can play The Moog Synthesizer. It is a computer like instrument with a piano keyboard. Since only one note sounds at a time to make music one needs a multi-track tape recorder to record each line of music separately. An electronic engineer is needed not only for the circuitry but also to program the millions of different sound combinations available — also each time the sound is changed The Moog has to be tuned! It takes about one hour of recording time to produce 30 seconds of listenable music.
In this album Sy takes the Moog Synthesizer and creates today’s electronic Christmas tree out of this new musical wonder. The Moog, a strange machine of lights, cords, inputs and outputs enters the festive world of the merriest season of all. It’s a wonderful gift for today’s caroleers. Sy Mann giftwraps all your Christmas favorites in the most exciting musical sound, and puts them under your glittering tree. Gift tagged to read “Merry Christmas from The Moog!”

SY MANN showed his earliest musical talent at age 6 when he began to correct mistakes, made by his older sister who was then a cello student, by reaching up to the keyboard of the family player-piano and striking the “right notes”. His parents took him to a piano instructor when he was 7 and in a short time it was discovered that he possessed absolute pitch. During public school assemblies he gave demonstrations of this phenomenon to the applause and wonder of his classmates and teachers. He continued his music education at NYU. Excelling in his music studies, Sy was elected to membership in the National Honorary music fraternity, PHI MU ALPHA SINFONIA and, later, held the post of student president of the music department of NYU School of Education. Back in civilian life after almost 4 years of service, Sy returned to NYU for his B.S. degree in Music Education, now a married man and father of a baby boy. Not particularly desirous of entering the teaching field, Sy continued with performing engagements, playing for most of show business’ top acts as well as stints with the bands of Alvino Ray and Benny Goodman. In 1949 he entered the radio field as staff pianist and arranger for New York’s top independent station WNEW. He then established himself in the recording, jingle and film music fields. In 1954 he joined the CBS music staff and currently is pianist-arranger on the Arthur Godfrey Show where he doubles on trumpet, vibraphone, clavietta, electric harpsichord and other assorted keyboard instruments. He has contributed his talents to numerous stars like Barbra Streisand, Tiny Tim, Sammy Davis, Connie Francis.

Anybody who plays piano can play The Moog Synthesizer. It is a computer like instrument with a piano keyboard. Since only one note sounds at a time to make music one needs a multi-track tape recorder to record each line of music separately. An electronic engineer is needed not only for the circuitry but also to program the millions of different sound combinations available — also each time the sound is changed The Moog has to be tuned! It takes about one hour of recording time to produce 30 seconds of listenable music.

In this album Sy takes the Moog Synthesizer and creates today’s electronic Christmas tree out of this new musical wonder. The Moog, a strange machine of lights, cords, inputs and outputs enters the festive world of the merriest season of all. It’s a wonderful gift for today’s caroleers. Sy Mann giftwraps all your Christmas favorites in the most exciting musical sound, and puts them under your glittering tree. Gift tagged to read “Merry Christmas from The Moog!”

@3 years ago with 7 notes
#Merry Christmas #Moog #Santa #Santa Clause #Santy #Sy Mann #Vintage #Xmas #cover art #Crazy Santa #Santa with Wild Eyes 
One of the finest arrangers of space age pop. After studying piano and trombone, he taught himself how to arrange and compose in his teens. He went to work with British big band leader Ted Heath in 1952 as a trombone player, but within two years Heath asked him to become his primary arranger. In the early 1960s, he and songwriter Johnny Worth (writing as “Les Vandyke”) masterminded the career of a minor British pop star, Eden Kane. The team wrote and produced a string of British top 10 hits for Kane in 1961-63. Keating then arranged and conducted a series of albums for London’s Phase 4 series. Keating tosses a bit of everything into his arrangements—strings, percussion, rock rhythm section, brass, vocal choruses with and without words. Yet his touch is subtle and swinging, understated and never bombastic.

One of the finest arrangers of space age pop. After studying piano and trombone, he taught himself how to arrange and compose in his teens. He went to work with British big band leader Ted Heath in 1952 as a trombone player, but within two years Heath asked him to become his primary arranger. In the early 1960s, he and songwriter Johnny Worth (writing as “Les Vandyke”) masterminded the career of a minor British pop star, Eden Kane. The team wrote and produced a string of British top 10 hits for Kane in 1961-63. Keating then arranged and conducted a series of albums for London’s Phase 4 series. Keating tosses a bit of everything into his arrangements—strings, percussion, rock rhythm section, brass, vocal choruses with and without words. Yet his touch is subtle and swinging, understated and never bombastic.

@3 years ago with 4 notes
#John Keating #Space #Space Experience #Space Age Pop #Retro #retro music 
 
One of the masterminds behind that mix of music and sound effects in 1960s commercials that’s since embedded itself deep in our subconscious. Henke got his start as a pianist, first playing in the house band at the Chez Paris nightclub in Chicago, then working in small combos in clubs around the city in the late 1930s. He joined Horace Heidt’s band in 1943, replacing Frankie Carle, who left to form his own group. He worked in radio and television after World War II, and performed on camera on George Gobel’s and Gary Moore’s variety shows.
For the first ten years or so after settling in L.A., Henke continued to work as a performer, usually leading a trio with Bill Newman on guitar and Bob Reed on bass. He recorded two albums with the trio, supplemented by Shelly Manne and Sammy Weiss on drums, for Contemporary Records—just about the time he called his performing career quits.
In 1955, he joined the television department at Disney, where he composed most of their commercials and for a few television series, most notably , Disneyland, the first incarnation of Walt Disney’s long-running series. He also became a partner at TV Spots, Inc., a production house that specialized in commercials. Unlike many musicians who dismissed commercial work as hack work, Henke took to the format immediately, and he was soon experimenting, adding sound effects and snatches of dialogue along with musical passages. He and graphic artist Eyvind Earle collaborated on numerous trailers for Hollywood movies, including “West Side Story.”
He released a few albums in the early 1960s that applied this approach to current hits, standards, and original compositions. The most famous of these is La Dolce Henke, which mixes jazzy compositions with sound effects (mostly simulated by musical instruments) and voice-overs to create miniature sonic dramas, like a double-entendre skit where a girl objects to her boyfriend’s sporty driving—or is it his sporty moves on her? Dynamic Adventures in Sound is less tongue-in-cheek and more cartoonish, very much along the lines of Ray Martin’sThe Sight of Sound.
A swinging cat with some crazy mixed-up wry-fidelity way-out concepts, dig?

One of the masterminds behind that mix of music and sound effects in 1960s commercials that’s since embedded itself deep in our subconscious. Henke got his start as a pianist, first playing in the house band at the Chez Paris nightclub in Chicago, then working in small combos in clubs around the city in the late 1930s. He joined Horace Heidt’s band in 1943, replacing Frankie Carle, who left to form his own group. He worked in radio and television after World War II, and performed on camera on George Gobel’s and Gary Moore’s variety shows.

For the first ten years or so after settling in L.A., Henke continued to work as a performer, usually leading a trio with Bill Newman on guitar and Bob Reed on bass. He recorded two albums with the trio, supplemented by Shelly Manne and Sammy Weiss on drums, for Contemporary Records—just about the time he called his performing career quits.

In 1955, he joined the television department at Disney, where he composed most of their commercials and for a few television series, most notably , Disneyland, the first incarnation of Walt Disney’s long-running series. He also became a partner at TV Spots, Inc., a production house that specialized in commercials. Unlike many musicians who dismissed commercial work as hack work, Henke took to the format immediately, and he was soon experimenting, adding sound effects and snatches of dialogue along with musical passages. He and graphic artist Eyvind Earle collaborated on numerous trailers for Hollywood movies, including “West Side Story.”

He released a few albums in the early 1960s that applied this approach to current hits, standards, and original compositions. The most famous of these is La Dolce Henke, which mixes jazzy compositions with sound effects (mostly simulated by musical instruments) and voice-overs to create miniature sonic dramas, like a double-entendre skit where a girl objects to her boyfriend’s sporty driving—or is it his sporty moves on her? Dynamic Adventures in Sound is less tongue-in-cheek and more cartoonish, very much along the lines of Ray Martin’sThe Sight of Sound.

A swinging cat with some crazy mixed-up wry-fidelity way-out concepts, dig?

@3 years ago with 7 notes
#La Dolce #Mel Henke #Music #cover art #Vintage #Retro